From Couch To Spartan Sprint – Exercise 2.2

Thou Shall Take Your Vitamins.

Which in this case means drinking things that taste like yard clippings.

 

The deeper spirit of Take Your Vitamins though is that most people get hung up on what they like and what you like is nowhere near the fucking point.

For one you can change what you like – people train themselves to like cigarettes and alcohol for years, they train so hard they seek professional help to untrain those cravings.

And second people never question if they really like something or if they merely want the absence of a craving. Let’s use soda as an example because it’s one I’m guilty of – I feel like having pop all the time. When the wanting comes up go ahead and get a soda. Then turn off everything. No video or TV, no music, no scrolling your phone, no nothing. And drink the soda.

Do you feel better? Do you feel the happiness that marketing and your dopamine system promised you? Probably not. You probably feel really underwhelmed and bored and kind of gross and you crave more distraction, because that’s all the soda really was.

You are actually suffering through the things you think you like and numbing it out with distraction.

…And if you’re willing to that for destructive things then go ahead and do it for constructive things. Like fiber shakes. Made from hemp.

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From Couch To Spartan Sprint – Exercise 2.2

Taking your vitamins also means not taking in anti-nutrients.

The best way to do it is to fill your kitchen with healthy foods and nothing else. Having boiled eggs and roasted pumpkin seeds on hand is good and so is getting rid of the breads and pastas.

Now something I found by accident when I went low carb is you have to eat a lot more food. A typical hamburger (which was my typical lunch) is like 400 calories and that’s a solid lunch, if you take away the bun and put all the contents in a bowl like a salad (my typical low-carb lunch) it’s about 100 calories.

A muffin is 300 to 500 calories and no one is satisfied with a muffin for meal. It’s calorie-dense and nutrient-poor. It’s fuel and if you don’t burn it you wear it. Around your belly.

Whereas you can eat 5 eggs and be full for a long time while benefiting from the protein, the fats, and the choline and still be under that many calories. So don’t be afraid that you’re eating too much when you’re low carb and you’re training – because it’s almost impossible.

From Couch To Spartan Sprint – Exercise 2

Operation Take Your Vitamins Motherfucker.

So the goal is to get Omega 3s, Glucosamine, and Collagen into your diet to deal with soreness, inflammation, and mobility issues. Healthy joints are safe joints and vice versa.

These micro-nutrients tend to run in a pack, foods with one usually the others, like in eggs and sardines. 3 eggs also has a day’s supply of choline for your brain health as well.

I buy seven cans of sardines in spring water a week (They cost a buck sixty at SuperStore) and everyday drain one, pour on some olive oil and rosemary and eat it out of the can with a spoon. Spartan.

Nuts and seeds are a great healthy choice. I keep roasted pumpkin seeds on hand and have a handful whenever I go through the kitchen. Any grocery store has bulk bins of nuts and seeds so go to town and find what you like, just not peanuts.

Now the thing with Omega 3s in particular is they need to be in a ratio to your Omega 6s. The good ratio is always written up as 1:1 or 1:4, and the common ratio in a typical diet is 1:30 or 1:60 or 1:youregonnafuckingdie. So if you eat a lot of grains and other carbs you may want to supplement your Omega 3 intake or just cut down on those carbs.

Instead get your carbs from cooked vegetables (from raw vegetables you don’t absorb much nutrition) so stir fry is your friend. Whatever oil you use keep it under it’s smoking point because I don’t want you to get cancer.

With all that said you should still expect to be sore at first, there’s no short cut to adaptation, we’re just preventing injury as best we can. Better to put the effort in preventing it than recovering from it. But you’re still going to have aches and pains and the only thing you can do is be mindful of the difference.

Starting out exercise is going to feel uncomfortable and you have learn to recognize what’s the good stress of work being done and what’s the bad stress of an injury creeping in.

Muscle soreness isn’t an injury and even if it’s insanely bad it’ll recover with no intervention and eventually you’ll adapt and it’ll stop happening. Joint pain is bad period. Don’t be a tough guy and fight through the pain, this isn’t about being mentally tough and sacrificing the body, that’s comes later, this is about adapting. We’re boiling a frog here, don’t turn up the heat too fast.

Nate from The Run Experience is always saying you gotta earn your miles. You don’t just step out the door and run 26 miles because you’d wreck yourself for zero benefit. You gotta earn that with smaller, shorter, safer runs.

Well I’m saying you gotta earn your Spartan. And you earn it by doing the truly hard part of putting your ego in check. There’s no epic slow-motion highlight reel of dudes taking collagen and glucosamine every morning for a year before stepping into the ring but they all do it.

How Working Out Can Get Harder As You Get Smarter

So yesterday I wrote about my suspicion that caffeine pills make me feel ill during workouts and what I might try going forward.

Last night, so I wouldn’t forget, I cut a pill in half and left it out for myself.

And I dutifully took it, waited what I thought the time between ingestion and work-out was yesterday and started swinging my warm up kettlebell.

Then, mentally frozen, I stopped. I haven’t eaten anything… I thought. Then the flood – what did I eat yesterday before the work out, I know I got a lot less sleep today than yesterday, and I’m not doing the same work out…

This is a terrible experiment.

Working out when you’re a noob is so easy, you just do it. All of the sudden it’s I didn’t eat a banana and 3 supplements 51 minutes ago, the work out is ruined!

You can go down so many dietary and exercise rabbit holes that you feel like everything could be fatally wrong. Like this meme, you vibe it.

this meme

The important thing to remember is to generally be going in the right direction and don’t get hurt and you’ll be better off at the end of each year than you were at the start. Don’t try to be optimal at everything all the time, no one thing will kill you.

Do experiment, do investigate, do immerse yourself in the knowledge and discussion even if it’s not your sport but ultimately remember that you’re searching for what’s best for you – not the official best thing in the world.

But also it wouldn’t kill me to track what I eat while intending to do a deliberate self-experiment.

Don’t Fall Into The Reward Trap

One of the biggest yet hardest traps to see in one’s fitness journey is the self-reward.

You worked out, hurray, you’re so pleased with yourself – and plus you’ve made room on the caloric budget of it – so you go ahead and have a soda, feeling good about it.

I’m falling into that bad again myself these days. I have a lot of free time in the afternoon after I’ve run all my miles in the morning. What started as eating indulgent food as a little celebration turned into joyless habit pretty quick and bam, I was insidiously back on the standard garbage diet.

For one, we do need to eat, so the work-around for that is planning what you eat long before you’re hungry. When we’re hungry our bodies start urging us toward the most energy dense foods available. So – as I’m going to say in another post I’m working on – Don’t Let Yourself Get Too Hungry.

Part two of that is basing your meals on nutritional needs rather than your sense of caloric need, at least to start with. Meaning, I know I need 3 eggs in a day for choline, I need pumpkins seeds for magnesium, I need beet juice for nitric oxide, etc etc etc. I choose the foods in the house based on filling some nutritional requirement rather simply liking them. And if I’ve had all the healthy stuff I know I need everyday and I’m still hungry I’ll have an indulgent snack. With all the bases covered it’s at least enough food that you won’t over do it.

Controversial opinion – meaning I don’t know where I stand on this really – I think having a treat in the house is a good idea. I’ve found that with nothing sweet in the house I end up buying snacks on the way home. Which means I’m buying them while hungry which is bad and they’re not budgeted for, meaning I’m wasting money. Having cookies in the house may be a good way of telling yourself there’s no need to pick something up while you’re out and once you’re home it’s easier to say you’ll have the cookies after all other nutritional bases are covered.

This is based on the fact that knowledge of beer in the fridge at home was one of the few things that could ease the craving to stay for pints after work back in that day.

And speaking of, don’t reward yourself with booze.

What I think is important is don’t reward yourself at all. The work out was the reward, the health is the reward, practice sitting with those feelings and being okay. The idea that when you feel good you have to consume something in order to heighten it is never going to help you. It’s going to leave you forever chasing.

The best thing you can do is take that celebratory instinct and turn it into motivation. Feel great after a work out? Clean the house. And I know it’s tough when you’re feeling up to do a thing that seems so down but if you can create momentum, striking while the iron is hot so to speak, then you’ll strongly ingrain good habits.

Because the other trap I’m falling into right now is the idea that I’ve done enough for the day. I come home from the gym by 10 in the morning and for some reason the work part of my brain will not activate. Like my work-relax balance is supposed to be set at 4 hours to 12 hours.

This is shifting away from the purpose of the post so maybe I’ll pick it up next time but I notice that the downside of being a morning person is that morning doesn’t really last long. There’s some mental window that closes for me at, like, 11am and suddenly I have inertia to anything I should do.

I’ll explore that further another time, for today remember to be careful how you reward yourself. Is it thinking you’ve earned¬†hours of junk food and video games with minutes of exercise or is it embracing the inner feeling of being a badass?

Videos I Liked This Week

Starting with a sad one. I’ve watched Buff Dudes for a while and I saw the surgery and the recovery and now he’s all clear to start working out again. But it’s so clear he’s emotionally struggling, he mentions depression several times and the pep talk he’s giving the audience is really him talking to himself. It can be so much easier to be positive when giving advice to someone else than when we’re alone in our heads.

 

Tom Delauer of course, he does 3 or 4 videos a week I’m bound to like one. And this one it’s just ’cause he acknowledges that keto is trendy and talks about where to go from here. That’s practical non-optimism right there. Keto isn’t going to take over the world but it’s popularity will have done some good.

 

 

This chap I just found likeable. He’s clearly already very athletic if his first training run is 8 miles and he’s skiing all the time so his first marathon time is a good 3:30. There’s a recklessness that I like in the way he signs up and trains that takes the looming fear out of the marathon.

 

and of course of course What I Learned, the best videos on the Tube. Watch anything of his I swear.

Testosterone Levels In Female Athletes, The Ruling Comes Down

Caster Semenya will have to suppress her testosterone to keep competing as a sprinter. (CBC Article)

This echoes something I was saying when I wrote about the The Virility Paradox, eventually we may have to organize sport not by gender but by hormone.

It’s not fair to Caster to have to medically dial down her natural athleticism and it’s not fair for others to have to compete against someone who has testosterone levels as high as someone doping testosterone.

But this ethical question then has to be applied to other sports as well. Dean Karnazes, one of the greatest runners in the world for those new to the blog, mentions in his TedTalk that he’s been examined and found that his body clears the by-product of exertion (commonly called lactic acid but is actually hydrogen ions) at an absurdly efficient rate. Or there was a runner mentioned in what I was reading last night, a multiple record holder who simply had the highest max heart rate ever seen. What do we do about them?

Even deeper though we have to ask what is the point of sport? What question are we seeking to answer by having people run arbitrary distances or score meaningless points?

Near as I can tell we’re trying to answer who trained better. That’s why it’s not okay to get a technological or chemical advantage that lessens the work of training. You can hire a coach and that gives you an advantage – their knowledge as opposed to your own – but the training workload still falls on you, we still declare that you earned the victory.

But then really someone who trained badly – ran themselves into the ground with overtraining while you recovered – should actually earn the victory. If it were purely about who worked harder.

Like I’ve said this is a bigger question than I can answer and I could write about it all day without getting to anything so I’ll let it go…